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Let's Talk Supply Chain

Let's Talk Supply Chain is not your average supply chain podcast. We feature not just the top of the industry, but also diverse voices from within the community, new innovations and the disrupters making waves in the industry. Don’t listen to the same ol' same ol', be sparked by new ideas and fresh perspectives only on Let's Talk Supply Chain.
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Now displaying: December, 2019
Dec 30, 2019

What a year it has been – from the Game of Thrones finale to Fedex being banned by Amazon, 2019 has been a memorable one. And at LTSC, it has been an incredibly memorable one! We added The SC, Supply Chain TV that includes several new shows from around the world, named the Best Supply Chain Podcast of 2019, launched our new website and observed exciting trends in supply chain this year.

Supply Chain professionals are loving Lets Talk Supply Chain and that includes our Linkedin Page. Our Women in Supply Chain series once again reigns supreme as the most frequently downloaded on the podcast on read on our blog, with AI and Supply Chain Performance Simplified gaining traction as the most downloaded. Looking back at 2019, the golden nuggets that standout are in this episode:

  • EP 47 - Jim Hayden, Netflix is a good example of supply chain visibility
  • EP 53 - Nozuko Mayeza, defying all odds in South Africa
  • EP 55 - Jonathan Briggs, Cost to Ship vs Cost to serve
  • EP 58 - Robert Garrison, Shinning a light into the dark corners of supply chain
  • EP 59 - Leah, Audrey & Sarah - The Trade Squad
  • EP 64 - Craig Fuller, Story behind Freightwaves
  • EP 65 - Graham Parker, Digital freight disrupted
  • EP 67 - Amjad Hussain, AI is closer than you think
  • EP 69 - Hugo Fuentes, supply chain performance simplified
  • EP 70 - Kathy Fulton, supply chain expertise can help when disaster strikes
  • EP 71 - Demo Perez, Panama - the hidden gem of logistics
  • EP 73 - Michiel Vos, Why I'm obsessed with coconuts
  • Exclusive from Logtech - Brian Glick on Blockchain
  • EP 87 - Rob Zomok, Are you getting the most out of your returns
  • EP 88 - Nicole Vernkidt, Challenges from both men and women
  • EP 91 - Howard Berg, Overwhelmed by content, learn to speed read

 

We thank you for LISTENING, SPONSORING, SUPPORTING, REVIEWING THE SHOW AND ENGAGING with us this year – we can’t wait to be a part of your 2020.

 

Dec 23, 2019

What’s better than one supply chain professional? Two supply chain professionals! Allison and George are a couple who met at a supply chain conference and both work in different areas of logistics. Allison mostly works on strategy and supply, whereas George works in the tactical planning of merging technology and software.

As a family working in supply chain, Allison and George complement each others backgrounds and regularly work together to solve supply chain challenges. In fact, they have white boards around the house where they discuss any issues they’re facing. This extends to their children, who also get involved and are understanding the huge role logistics have in getting products to our door.

Their advice to next generation supply chain professionals? Get deep technical expertise early on and don’t wait too long to switch into the supply chain industry. Start working with products, learn the technical aspects and build a repertoire of skills. As Sarah says herself, always keep your options open and try different departments to see where you fit best. Allison and George are both minorities in supply chain, and although diversity has improved, Allison admits that women need more support not just from leaders, but also from other women. She also recommends finding your own personal board of directors to challenge you and to be your cheerleaders.

In this episode we discuss:

  • [0.36] Supply Chain conferences aren't just for networking
  • [19.30] Supply chain in the family
  • [23.02] Advice to the next generation in supply chain
  • [25.31] Women in supply chain
  • [29.25] Their plans for the future

Resources and links mentioned: 

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Dec 16, 2019

Human trafficking is supply chain. As horrendous as that sounds, it’s true. There are more slaves today than there have been in the whole of human history. That’s why Grant is passionate about contributing any help he can for operations that rescues and takes care of trafficked kids.

Like a grocery supply chain, a human trafficking supply chain requires demand. Traffickers use fake orphanages that sell or rent children for many different reasons. The statistics are shocking: 36% of children are trafficked by family members, and human trafficking is a $150 billion industry. The only way to take control of this supply chain is to break it down and disrupt it.

Grant talks about how he is getting involved with his new initiative "Freedom Rings" inspired by Tim Ballard's "Operation Underground Railroad" an organization that goes undercover and “buys” children from fake orphanages to then let them free. Grant also shares how supply chain and slavery is connected going back into the 1800s with Henry Box Brown story that shows how it takes creativity and courage to rescue those that are trapped. Getting ready to launch officially in 2020, Grant's own "Freedom Rings" organizes boxing events in Tennessee which helps raise awareness for human trafficking and helps fund human trafficking operations. If you are looking to help, Supply chain professionals are creative by nature - our expertise is essential in helping solve the problem of human trafficking so get in touch!

In this episode we discuss:

  • [0.58] How human trafficking is supply chain
  • [10.56] What makes a successful supply chain
  • [17.38] The statistics on human trafficking
  • [24.15] The story that connects supply chain to slavery dating back to the 1800s
  • [28.00] How to help as someone working in supply chain

Resources and links mentioned:

  • Freedom Rings

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Dec 9, 2019

Mike is the CEO of CCM, a chassis management company that creates fluidity in the supply chain. What makes them special? Their CCM pools work as an ‘open membership’ model that allow many different carriers access to chassis' faster. You might be wondering what exactly that means for your supply chain and we will paint that picture in this episode but from a high level,  It means that if there aren't any chassis available, the pool will find some and send some to the location that needs them the most!

This unique model allows all stakeholders (ocean carriers, truckers, leasing companies) to all be under one management, which in turn reduces costs, delays and makes the industry generally more efficient. This also allows every stakeholder to be represented under one network, with CCM working as a neutral facilitator making sure that chassis go where they are needed. This means there’s a large reduction in fleet and maintenance programs are much easier to coordinate, which bring us to the most important benefit of them all - the environment and sustainability which we are hearing more and more about each day.

There are many benefits to having everything under one management, one big one being sustainability. Usually, every line has their own chassis, this means that every operation takes longer - the driver needs to go find the chassis, the train is therefore delayed and is running longer. By sharing chassis in an interoperable pool there are fewer delays, a reduction in the volume of activity and more efficiency - this helps reduce the overall carbon footprint of the companies.

In this episode we discuss:

  • [0.28] What exactly is CCM chassis pool
  • [4.51] The challenges of current shippers
  • [10.39] Who really needs this solution?
  • [13.35] Visualize how chassis pools can help you
  • [19.15] What does this mean for the environment

Resources and links mentioned:

Dec 2, 2019

THE WISC SERIES IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY HULFT

It can be daunting to get back into the workforce after years without working. Lisa went back to work in supply chain after 12 years out of the workforce taking care of her three boys. Thanks to her dedicated self-learning and determination, she was able to get the position she wanted in less than a year of looking for a new start.

How? Imagine yourself as a case study, Lisa says. She regarded her situation as a template, analyzed the economy, did a lot of self-training and adopted an unstoppable mindset. She is proof that if you really want it you can make it happen. Your journey to success is not only about finding the right position but also the advancement of your career and negotiation is an important part of that so Lisa adopts a similar mindset when it comes to negotiation. Negotiation is about defining a problem and making sure both sides win. When it comes to negotiating, Lisa recommends looking at other opportunities rather than your salary, such as flexibility and in-company training.

In her free time, Lisa helps other women get back into the workforce through talks, workshops and blog posts. Her main advice? Make sure not to put the onus on other people for your work to be recognized. Acknowledge your value and make sure your company is aware of it. Her advice to students: negotiate as high as you can on your first job, it could make a difference of literally millions in the future.

In this episode we discuss:

  • [1.15] Lisa’s journey
  • [9.49] The risks of going back into the workforce
  • [12.29] How Lisa self-trained herself
  • [15.06] The art of negotiation
  • [22.40] Tips and advice to listener
  • (29:10) there are 10,000 job opportunities in supply chain opening every day
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